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Building a Servile Class

teaparty2I’m fond of my employers. Ok – to be honest, I don’t know much about the board, but I know several of the execs, including the CEO. I like most of them. I even like the one who closed a quarterly meeting not long ago with a prayer thanking the almighty for our company and its provision of good jobs for all of us, as tone deaf as that may have been in a meeting where more layoffs were announced. I appreciate these folks – their willingness to throw their lot in with me and the other cogs to create a product that serves people well and earns us all a living. It isn’t a perfect company – I have plenty of complaints about how it is run. But compared to a lot of the choices out there it is a good place to work.

I won’t complain that for similar investments in time, work, and creativity as I make, the executives here are compensated at a rate several times over my own salary. I won’t complain that those who trust us enough to invest their capital in our endeavor are able to profit very handsomely with little or no contribution in terms of time, work, or creativity.

But I won’t join a servile class of people who regard the investing and managing class as the stewards of America, and and us the grateful, groveling servants of same. The small company I work for takes reasonably good care of its people – but if they get bought out by Wal-Mart, by golly we have the right to organize to get the fairness back. Those investors who “hire me”… I love them, too, but that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t bear the cost of citizenship while reaping the greatest rewards of it. That doesn’t mean they have the right to pollute my air and water. That doesn’t mean they have a right to let someone else pick up the tab for the social structures that enable them to exist. That doesn’t mean they have a right to monopolize the marketplace so that I cannot compete with them if I choose to. That doesn’t mean that they can order my life. That doesn’t mean that they can prevent me organizing with a union to gain fair treatment. That doesn’t mean that they can gamble away the foundations of our economy without regulation or oversight. That doesn’t mean that they can buy off my congressperson to accomplish any of the goals above.

I’m concerned that one of the biggest negative impacts of movement conservatism will be the furtherance of a servile working class who truly believe in special entitlement for the elite. Subjugation is one thing – but we shouldn’t be taught to like it and beg for our scraps.

3 comments to Building a Servile Class

  • I wanted to go to a teaparty but I had to work :-)

    I hear every word you are saying. I have always loved what William Faulkner said when he quit the post office

    “I reckon I’ll be at the beck and call of folks with money all my life, but thank God I won’t ever again have to be at the beck and call of every son of a bitch who’s got two cents to buy a stamp.”

    I have never understood the employer worship either. I figure I am making the man more than I am costing the man or else he would put my ass in the street.

    Capitalism is pretty much that simple.

  • [...] blogger Smijer wants to make sure we don’t conflate anti-tax sentiment with giving the rich anything they [...]

  • RW

    That doesn’t mean they have a right to let someone else pick up the tab for the social structures that enable them to exist.

    You’re right and you’ll find few who disagree, but I think that one could be targeted at the 45% or so who pay no federal income taxes, yet who push for more gimme programs for which they qualify.

    That doesn’t mean they have a right to monopolize the marketplace so that I cannot compete with them if I choose to.

    Absolutely 100% true. Doesn’t apply to the one entity that you can’t compete against: the government. Quick example: If you try to set up your own lottery system within your state (or my state), you’re headed for the slammer. Only the state can run lotteries.

    That doesn’t mean that they can order my life.

    Again, that one is done by the government.

    That doesn’t mean that they can gamble away the foundations of our economy without regulation or oversight.

    Buddy, the people overseeing & regulatin’ have been the ones gambling away the foundations of our economy. You and I didn’t spend us into 10 trillion in debt.

    That doesn’t mean that they can buy off my congressperson to accomplish any of the goals above.

    Depends on which “they” you’re talking about. The teachers’ unions that are STILL clamoring for more funds (again) and more teachers (again) and less standardization (again) because they (again) cannot do their jobs with the billions they’ve been given or the businessmen who are STILL looking for loopholes (again) so they can restructure their corporate offices and vote themselves pay raises (much like congress, no?).

    One more, with corrections and again all due respect & a hint of humor:

    I’m concerned that one of the biggest negative impacts of movement liberalism will be the furtherance of a servile working class who truly believe in government programs that they qualify for but are primarily paid for by other people. Subjugation and coerced conformity is one thing – but we shouldn’t be taught to like it and be told we’re selfish if we complain about carrying the lion’s share of the load, while those riding in the cart are telling us to pull harder.

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